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New study suggests chewing one additional piece of sugar-free gum per day could reduce global dental expenditures from treating tooth decay by $4.1 billion a year

11 April 2017

World-first data published in the American Journal of Dentistry builds on evidence to support the benefits of sugar-free gum in oral care

Increasing consumption of sugar-free chewing gum by just one piece per day could save billions of dollars worldwide on dental expenditures from treating tooth decay, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Dentistry.1 The data is significant given tooth decay and oral diseases rank fourth among the most expensive global health conditions to treat, according to the World Health Organization.2 While tooth decay is largely preventable, it still affects 60-90% of schoolchildren and nearly all adults globally.2

The first-of-its-kind global study suggests that if current consumers of sugar-fee gum increase their consumption by just one extra piece per day as part of a complete oral hygiene routine, global dental expenditures from treating tooth decay could be reduced by US$4.1 billion a year.1 The data provides new insights that build on the extensive body of evidence supporting the benefits of chewing sugar-free gum in oral care.

The study was funded by Wrigley and conducted by specialist health economics research group, the Institute of Empirical Health Economics (IfEG), with input from an international scientific steering committee comprised of thought-leaders in dental and public health and economics.

“The study represents a solid and substantial approach to the accurate calculation of cost savings in industrial countries that would arise from increasing sugar-free gum consumption,” said Professor Reinhard Rychlik, MA MD, PhD, PhD, Director of the IfEG and the study’s lead author. “Chewing sugar-free gum as a preventive measure for tooth decay has the potential to deliver significant dental care cost savings worldwide.”

Potential cost savings reach $2.07 billion a year in the U.S., representing nearly 3 percent of expenditures on treating tooth decay. Comparatively, potential cost savings could reach $1.1 billion a year in Europe and $149 million a year in China.1

“In addition to the well-established clinical benefits, for the first time, this study models the reduction in the relative risk of tooth decay and subsequent cost savings for dental care as a result of increased consumption of sugar-free gum as part of a complete oral hygiene routine. While further studies are needed, these are exciting new insights which add to the extensive body of evidence on the benefits of sugar-free gum in oral care.” said Michael Dodds, BDS, PhD., Wrigley’s lead oral health scientist. 

Recognized Oral Health Benefits of Sugar-free Gum
Global rates of tooth decay continue to present a major public health concern – nearly all adults experience tooth decay2 – suggesting that new preventive strategies may be required to supplement existing measures in reducing the risk of tooth decay and improving oral health. The oral care benefits of chewing sugar-free gum are widely recognized and supported by various regulatory and governmental authorities,3,4 FDI World Dental Federation and nearly 20 national dental associations around the world. The growing body of evidence could support the inclusion of sugar-free gum in national oral healthcare advice, alongside other proven oral hygiene behaviours in future.

References
1.  Rychlik R, Kreimendahl F, Blaich C et al (2017). A global approach to assess the economic benefits of increased consumption of sugar-free chewing gum. Am J Dent, in press.
2. World Health Organization. Oral Health Disease Burden. Last Accessed August 2016. Available at: www.who.int/oral_health/disease_burden/global/en/
3. EFSA (2010) Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to sugar-free chewing gum and reduction of tooth demineralization which reduces the risk of dental caries pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/20061. Available at: http://www.efsa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/scientific_output/files/main_documents/1775.pdf. Last accessed: October 2015
4. Health Canada. Summary of Health Canada’s assessment of a health claim about sugar-free chewing gum and dental caries risk reduction. Available at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/label-etiquet/claims-reclam/assess-evalu/gum-gomme-dental-carie-dentaireeng.php Last accessed December 2016.

World Oral Health Day, Prevention and the Power of the Smile

17 March 2017

Since 2013, the FDI World Dental Federation has celebrated and organized World Oral Health Day, held March 20, to raise awareness of the importance of good oral health and its significance in safeguarding general health and well-being. Once again, Wrigley is proud to support this international day of action.

As we think about Oral Health, it is not uncommon to focus on the converse of oral health – namely oral diseases. While it is relatively simple to quote statistics on untreated caries in children and adults, provide stark warnings on tobacco use, and point to the links between periodontal diseases and systemic health, why not focus instead on the positive benefits of a healthy mouth and dentition on overall health and wellbeing!

In September of last year, the FDI unveiled a universal definition of Oral Health stating it:

Is multi-faceted and includes, but is not limited to, the ability to speak, smile, smell, taste, touch, chew, swallow and convey a range of emotions through facial expressions with confidence and free from pain or discomfort, and disease of the craniofacial complex.

This holistic definition conveys a sense of wellbeing and quality of life that goes beyond the absence of caries or gingivitis. Conveying a range of emotions, of course, includes smiling. A study conducted by the University of Cambridge Psychometrics Centre, funded by Wrigley, assessed how people smile in photos and linked this to psychometric profiles and self-perceived oral health, based on a validated questionnaire[1]. More than 2,000 participants submitted photos and provided access to their social media profiles, from which more than 300,000 faces were identified and subjected to image analysis that determined a ‘smile score’. Smile scores and psychological traits were combined in a massive database to reveal interesting correlations. Based on a self-reported assessment of oral health:

People reporting to have better oral health responded as being significantly more satisfied with life than those reporting to have poor oral health.
Better self-reported oral health was positively correlated with frequency and intensity of smiling in photos.
With this growing recognition of the link between oral health and psychological traits, we are reminded of the central importance of better oral disease prevention.

While we tend to associate dental disease prevention with use of fluoride, oral hygiene, sealants and other traditional clinical and preventive modalities, evidence suggests that chewing sugar-free gum is a simple and enjoyable complementary behavior to reduce caries incidence. These benefits are widely recognized and supported by global regulatory authorities, dental professional associations and some governments. Building on these established benefits, a new study funded by Wrigley, to be published in the April issue of the American Journal of Dentistry[2] models a potential economic benefit of chewing sugar-free gum. Further studies are needed, but these data provide fresh insights showing that chewing sugar-free gum could positively affect global dental care expenditures at a country level.

Wrigley is committed to supporting oral health and helping people smile more. Join us in our simple mission this World Oral Health Day!

Disclosure:

Michael Dodds BDS, PhD is Oral Health Lead Scientist at the Wrigley Company. Wrigley is proud to support World Oral Health Day 2017.

“WRIGLEY, SMILE BACK, and all associated trademarks and designs are trademarks of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company or affiliates. Used with permission.”

[1] Smile Back Study, Cambridge University, 2015. Full study available upon request

[2] Rychlik R, Kreimendahl F, Blaich C et al: A global approach to assess the economic benefits of increased consumption of sugar-free chewing gum. Am J Dent 2017, in press.

Wrigley signs on to the FDI Vision 2020 partnership

9 September 2016

Wrigley has become the latest partner to join Vision 2020, an FDI initiative to raise the political profile of oral health among public health officials and other decision-makers at national and international level.

“Wrigley has been a long-time keen supporter of FDI work and I’m delighted they have agreed to sign on to our ambitions in oral health advocacy by strengthening the activities and goals of Vision 2020,” said FDI President Dr Patrick Hescot. “This support will enable us to position oral health where it needs to be: high on the global health agenda.”

“Wrigley is very supportive of the Vision 2020 ambition, to drive awareness among governments and health authorities of the human and economic cost of oral disease, and to develop strategies to address this burden,” said Matthew Kent, Senior Corporate Affairs Manager, Global Oral Care. “Through Vision 2020 we have an opportunity to change behaviours at a grass-roots level, to focus more on prevention oriented oral health care.”

Launched in 2012, Vision 2020 provided a map of the challenges facing the oral health community, which were to:

  • Meet the increasing need and demand for oral health care
  • Expand the role of the health-care professional
  • Shape a responsive educational model
  • Mitigate the impacts of socio-economic dynamics
  • Foster fundamental and translational research and technology

Today, FDI global advocacy and Vision 2020 have merged into common strategy with a twin focus: on the one hand, ensuring the oral health community is aligned and equipped to put pressure on national governments to address oral disease within national health action plans; on the other ensuring that FDI member national dental associations and the wider oral health community are represented in the international health policy debate.

Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program
The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) partners with dental professionals worldwide, helping them improve their patients’ oral health through one additional simple and enjoyable step in their daily routine: chewing sugarfree gum after eating and drinking on-the-go. For more than 25 years, WOHP has supported independent clinical research into the benefits of chewing gum, including saliva stimulation, plaque acid neutralization and tooth strengthening to help dental professionals and their patients understand the role of sugarfree gum as a convenient tool for everyday oral care. WOHP is one example of how we make a difference to people and the planet through performance, and how we incorporate our principles based approach to business into all that we do.

Review of latest evidence confirms oral health benefits of sugar-free gum

6 June 2016

By: Michael Dodds, BDS, PhD

A new review of the most up-to-date scientific research reinforces the positive effects of sugar-free gum (SFG) on oral health and emphasizes the identification of active ingredients in gum that could facilitate prevention and removal of oral biofilm.

The review confirmed the oral health benefits of chewing sugar-free gum, including the clearance of food debris, reduction in oral dryness, increase of biofilm pH, remineralization of enamel, freshening breath through the reduction of volatile sulfur compounds and inhibition of extrinsic tooth stain. These benefits are attributed to increased mastication and salivation. The authors say that with the addition of active ingredients in chewing gums, it may be possible to expand these benefits to also include:

  • Enhanced inhibition of extrinsic tooth stain and calculus formation.
  • Enhanced enamel remineralization.
  • Reduction of the numbers of bacteria in saliva and amount of oral biofilm.
  • Neutralization of biofilm pH.
  • Enhanced reduction of halitosis.

The analysis, which was published in Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery in May 2016, looked at the evidence for oral health benefits of chewing SFG, citing 138 articles, and drawing findings from 69 papers. Its emphasis was on identifying active ingredients in gum that facilitate the prevention and removal of oral biofilm. The evidence shows that while chewing gum can allow active ingredients to be gradually released into the oral cavity, they have a low potency and are rapidly washed out from the oral cavity by increased salivation. Furthermore, the health benefits from increased salivation and mastication may easily overshadow the additional benefits of added active ingredients unless used for prolonged periods of time, making it hard to demonstrate their clinical benefits.

Oral diseases develop when the balance within the oral microbiome is lost and pathogenic bacteria start to dominate. This occurs, for instance, when cariogenic strains in a biofilm produce an excess of acids through fermentation of environmental sugars causing enamel demineralization or when peridontopathogens residing mostly in gingival pockets cause gingivitis or, in more advanced state, periodontitis.

The review confirms the well-documented benefits of chewing SFG associated with increased mastication and salivation, many of which are supported by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

Chewing SFG results in a 10-fold increase in salivary flow rate, which enhances the ability of saliva to clear the mouth of food debris and sugars, neutralize acids and support remineralization, all of which can help to reduce the incidence of dental caries.

While data points to specific benefits for certain active ingredients, such as xylitol, carbamide and polyphosphates, the authors state longer term clinical trials are needed to confirm these benefits. Future studies on active ingredients should focus specifically on targeting pathogenic bacteria, whilst leaving the healthy microbiome unaffected. However, the authors of the review conclude that the basic benefits of the long-term chewing of SFG due to increased mastication and salivation are beyond dispute.

About the author

Michael Dodds, BDS, PhD is Oral Health Lead Scientist at the Wrigley Company, based in Chicago, with responsibility for developing scientific support for the oral health benefits of chewing sugar-free gum. He holds a dental degree from the University of Edinburgh and a PhD in Dental Science from the University of Liverpool. Prior to joining Wrigley in 2002, Dr. Dodds was Associate Professor of Community Dentistry, San Antonio, Texas, and is currently also adjunct Associate Professor of Pediatric Dentistry at the UIC College of Dentistry, Chicago.

What’s behind a smile? WOHP celebrates the science of smiling on World Oral Health Day

20 March 2015

World Oral Health Day 2015

Today, the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) joins FDI World Dental Federation, its partners, dental professionals, and patients around the world to celebrate World Oral Health Day (WOHD) and the 2015 theme “Smile for Life.”

Most of us are unaware of just how many physical and neurological components are involved in the simple act of smiling. World Oral Health Day is an important occasion to focus on the science of smiling, and remind patients of the simple oral hygiene routines that can help protect their teeth and smiles, including chewing sugar-free gum.

Smiling requires a number of muscular and neurological features which operate “behind the scenes.” As many as 12 muscles are involved in the creation of a smile, depending on the type of smile and our individual facial characteristics.1 In an unconscious, “genuine” smile, also known as the Duchenne smile in honor of a 19th century French neurologist who studied the mechanism of human facial expression, signals travel from the unconscious areas of the brain to contract facial muscles, in particular the obicularis occuli around the eye and the zygomaticus major which controls the corners of the mouth. Conversely, in a conscious “social” smile, signals from the brain bypass the eyes and contract only the muscles around the mouth.2 Researchers have shown that the Duchenne smile produces greater activity in the brain’s left anterior temporal region and is linked to positive emotions.3

More importantly, a smile is produced—and defined—by its most visible, obvious components: the teeth and gums. The condition, shape, position, and color of the teeth and gums can impact the function and aesthetic appearance of a smile 4 and could potentially influence a person’s desire to smile in public.

“The 2015 World Oral Health Day theme of Smile for Life has two meanings – a lifelong smile and celebrating life,” said FDI President Dr Tin Chun Wong. “The three main dental reasons that people don’t smile are gum disease, tooth decay or tooth loss, so the better we prevent these the more chance we have of keeping our smiles for life.”

Given the important link between teeth and smiles, WOHP supports the goals of World Oral Health Day all year round. WOHP partners with dental professionals to help them improve their patients’ oral health through one extra simple and enjoyable step in their daily routine: chewing sugar-free gum after eating and drinking, particularly while on-the-go. Science demonstrates that chewing sugar-free gum stimulates the production of saliva, increasing the flow rate by up to 10 to 12 times the resting rate, which helps to wash away food debris, neutralize plaque acids and naturally remineralize tooth enamel to help strengthen teeth.

“The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program is proud to support World Oral Health Day 2015 and to raise awareness of the many factors that enable the simple act of smiling,” said Matthew Kent, Global Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program Manager. “Our teeth play an essential role in our desire and ability to smile. So we are working with dentists, hygienists, and patients to encourage the adoption of oral hygiene behaviors, such as chewing sugar-free gum, that can help keep teeth healthy.”

To learn more about World Oral Health Day, please click here. To learn more about the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program and the oral health benefits of chewing sugar-free gum, please click here.

About the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program
WOHP partners with dental professionals worldwide, helping them improve their patients’ oral health through one extra simple and enjoyable step in their daily routine: chewing sugar-free gum after eating and drinking on-the-go. WOHP supports independent clinical research into the benefits of chewing gum, including saliva stimulation, plaque acid neutralization and tooth strengthening. For more information, visit: www.wrigleyoralcare.com

About FDI
FDI World Dental Federation serves as the principal representative body for more than one million dentists worldwide, developing health policy and continuing education programs, speaking as a unified voice for dentistry in international advocacy, and supporting member associations in global oral health promotion activities. Over the years, it has developed programs, initiatives, campaigns, policies and congresses, always with a view to occupying a space that no other not-for-profit group can claim. FDI works at national and international level through its own activities and those of its member dental associations. It is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a member of the World Health Professionals Alliance (WHPA). For more information, visit: www.fdiworldental.org

About WOHD
World Oral Health Day (WOHD) is celebrated every year on the 20th March. It is an international day to celebrate the benefits of a healthy mouth and to promote worldwide awareness of the issues around oral health and the importance of looking after oral hygiene to everyone old and young. It is a day for people to have fun – a day that should be full of activities that make us laugh, sing and smile! For more information, visit: www.worldoralhealthday.com


References

  1. 1. Goldfinger, Eliot. Human Anatomy for Artists: The Elements of Form. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997. Pages 69-101.
  2. 2. Carter, Rita. The Brain Book, 2nd edition. London: DK Publishing, 2014.
  3. 3. Ekman P, Davidson RJ, Friesen WV. The Duchenne smile: emotional expression and brain physiology. II. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1990;58:342-53.
  4. 4. Kershaw S, Newton JT. Williams DM. The influence of tooth colour on the perceptions of personal characteristics among female dental patients: comparisons of unmodified, decayed and ‘whitened’ teeth. Br Dent J. 2008; 204:E9.

Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program announces winners of the annual IADR-Wrigley Salivary Research Award

16 March 2015

Six fold increase in entries received for the 2015 award

The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program is delighted to announce the three winners of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR)-Wrigley Salivary Research Award. Now in its sixth year, the annual award celebrates dental scientists, dental students and non-dental students, from around the world, who have made a significant contribution to salivary research. This year, more than 90 entries (in the form of abstracts) were submitted to the award, which covers three categories:

  • Basic Salivary Research Award for a Dental or Non-Dental Student
  • Clinical Salivary Research Award for Dental Students
  • Clinical Salivary Research Award for Dental Scientists

2015 Winners

  • Yuliya Mulyar, The University of Western Ontario, Canada, Wrigley Basic Salivary Research Award for a Dental or Non-Dental Student ($2,000)
    • Abstract: Anti-Cariogenic Effect of a Novel Encapsulation System for Salivary Proteins
  • Brady Petersen, The University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Wrigley Clinical Salivary Research Award for Dental Students ($1,500)
    • Abstract: Exosome Analysis: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma MicroRNA Isolation in Culture
  • Eduardo Moffa, The University of Western Ontario, Canada, Wrigley Clinical Salivary Research Award for Dental Scientists ($1,500)
    • Abstract: Identification of Histatin 5 Salivary Complexes Using Mass Spectrometry

2015 Winners

“This is the sixth year that the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program has supported the award and we are excited to see such a marked increase in interest to carry out research in this fascinating and important field,” said Michael Dodds, BDS, PhD, Oral Health Lead Scientist, Wrigley.

“The work of the three awardees truly demonstrates the diversity of contemporary salivary research, ranging from fundamental understanding of how salivary proteins interact, a system that in the future could be applied to early identification of oral cancers, through to a nano-encapsulation system that uses fragments of salivary proteins to protect enamel from decay”, continues Dr. Dodds. “The new insights from these studies will allow us, and others in the dental field, to continue to build on our knowledge and understanding of the role and benefits of saliva in maintaining oral health.”

The IADR General Session, taking place in Boston from March 11-14, is a worldwide networking opportunity for the craniofacial, oral and dental research community. More than 5,000 delegates are in attendance, including representatives from 60 leading dental companies and institutions, and more than 3,000 scientific abstracts will be presented.

The partnership between the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program and the IADR Salivary Research Group was inaugurated, along with the award, in 2010 and continues to expand its global reach. The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program contribution, in the form of a travel bursary, enabled the winners to attend the General Session and present their research findings.

To learn more about the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program, please click here

2014 IADR-Wrigley Salivary Research Award Winners Announced

30 June 2014

Presented at the 2014 IADR Congress in Cape Town, the award underscores the important link between saliva and good oral health.

Wrigley is pleased to congratulate the winners of the 2014 International Association for Dental Research (IADR)-Wrigley Salivary Research Award.  Now in its 5th year, the annual award celebrates dental scientists, dental students and non-dental students who have made a significant contribution to salivary related research.

2014 Winners

2014 Winners

  • Nilminie Rathnayake, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden: Basic Salivary Research Award for a Dental or Non-Dental Student ($2,000 USD)
    • Abstract: Cardiovascular disease biomarkers in saliva and plasma
  • Joao N.A.R. Ferreira, National University of Singapore, Singapore: Clinical Salivary Research Award for Dental Scientists ($1,500 USD)
    • Abstract: Neurturin-expressing adenovirus protects salivary gland function from irradiation damage
  • Omer Deutsch, Hebrew University, Israel: Salivary Research Group Award ($1,500 USD)
    • Abstract: Oral-Fluids Proteomics Characterization of Sjögren’s-Syndrome Patients After Removal of High-Abundance-Proteins

Wrigley and the IADR presented the awards to the 2014 winners on Thursday, June 26 at the IADR 92nd General Session & Exhibition which took place in Cape Town, South Africa.

Did you know?

Chewing sugar-free gum increases the production of saliva, which can help wash away food particles, and can help to restore optimum plaque pH levels faster than without chewing sugar-free gum. The neutralization of these plaque acids can help keep your teeth healthy.

The oral care benefits of chewing sugar-free gum have been recognized by the FDI World Dental Federation and supported by nearly 30 national dental associations worldwide.

“The Salivary Research Award is part of Wrigley’s commitment to increasing research, understanding and dialogue around the role of saliva in oral health, as well as the associated benefits of chewing sugar-free gum,” said Marcelo Aspiras, Principal Technology Scientist, Scientific Discovery, Global Innovation Center (GIC), Wrigley. “The 2014 winners exemplify the incredible work being done by dental students, researchers, and clinicians around the world on this topic – work that deserves to be recognized and celebrated.”

Inaugurated in 2010 through a partnership between the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program and the IADR Salivary Research Group, the Salivary Research Award continues to expand its global reach each year. In 2014, 16 applicants from 14 countries submitted abstracts for the award. The awards helped recipients with travel costs to attend the IADR 92nd General Session & Exhibition in Cape Town and present their research findings during a scheduled session.

To learn more about the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program, please click here

 

 

Wrigley Joins Global Community to Support World Oral Health Day

20 March 2014

March 20 is World Oral Heath Day and this year the theme is “Celebrating Healthy Smiles.” Wrigley is a proud partner of this day-of-action which is organized by FDI World Dental Federation, the global organization representing over a million dentists worldwide. World Oral Health Day celebrates the benefits of a healthy mouth, promotes awareness of the issues around oral health and the importance of looking after oral hygiene. Wrigley will join dental professionals, dental students, policy makers, researchers, celebrities, and other partners from more than 100 countries to encourage people to make a lifelong commitment to their oral health and healthy smiles.

“Wrigley is committed to making a real contribution to the oral health of the world,” said Matthew Kent, Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program Manager. “By working together on World Oral Health Day and throughout the year, we can help ensure people have the information and the oral care tools they need to protect and promote their oral health.”

Across the globe, oral disease is a significant public health challenge. Up to 90% of the world’s population will suffer from oral disease in their lifetime, including caries (the process which can lead to tooth decay) and periodontal disease.

1 The incidence of tooth decay appears to be getting worse; the American Journal of Dentistry reports an increase in the prevalence of dental caries in primary and permanent teeth of children and adults since 2001.2 Worryingly, it is estimated that between 60% and 90% of school children worldwide have dental caries.1

To help turn the tide against these statistics, activities across the globe on World Oral Health Day will draw attention to the burden of oral disease and provide information on simple, preventive steps we can all take to maintain good oral health, including: brushing teeth with fluoride-containing toothpaste at least twice daily; regular dental check-ups; and chewing sugar-free gum after eating and drinking on-the-go.3

To encourage families to look after their teeth and their oral health, FDI has launched “The Tooth Thief”, an illustrated book which tells the story of Mascarpone, the famous mouse detective, who comes to the aid of the Tooth Fairy. In addition to being an entertaining mystery story, the book shares important oral health information and tips. World renowned Ivorian Manchester City footballer Yaya Touré wrote the foreword to the book. 

“Your teeth are precious. Once you’ve lost your milk teeth, your new ones need to last a lifetime. That’s why I am happy to support World Oral Health Day,” said Touré. “It is a chance for everyone, no matter where you live, no matter your gender, no matter your age, to celebrate healthy smiles.” 

To learn more about World Oral Health Day 2014 and to download “The Tooth Thief,” please visit http://www.worldoralhealthday.com/book (available from 20 March). The book will also be available from the Apple iBook Store and Amazon.

About the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program
The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) partners with dental professionals worldwide, helping them improve their patients’ oral health through one extra simple and enjoyable step in their daily routine: chewing sugarfree gum after eating and drinking on-the-go. For more than 25 years, WOHP has supported independent clinical research into the benefits of chewing gum, including saliva stimulation, plaque acid neutralization and tooth strengthening to help dental professionals and their patients understand the role of sugarfree gum as a convenient tool for everyday oral care. Today, Wrigley operates oral healthcare programs in 47 countries worldwide. WOHP is one example of how we make a difference to people and the planet through performance, and how we incorporate our principles based approach to business into all that we do. For more information, visit: www.wrigleyoralcare.com

About FDI
FDI World Dental Federation serves as the principal representative body for more than one million dentists worldwide, developing health policy and continuing education programs, speaking as a unified voice for dentistry in international advocacy, and supporting member associations in global oral health promotion activities. Over the years, it has developed programs, initiatives, campaigns, policies and congresses, always with a view to occupying a space that no other not-for-profit group can claim.  FDI works at national and international level through its own activities and those of its member dental associations. It is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO) and a member of the World Health Professionals Alliance (WHPA).  For more information, visit: www.fdiworldental.org

References

1. World Dental Federation.  World Oral Health Day 2014 Toolkit.  Available at: http://www.worldoralhealthday.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/WOHD2014toolkit_eng.pdf. Accessed 12 March 2014.
2. Bagramian RA, Garcia-Godoy F, Volpe AR. The global increase in dental caries: a pending public health crisis. Am J Dent. 2009;22:3-8.
3. Geurtsen W, Hellwig E, Klimek J. Basic recommendations for caries prophylaxis in permanent dentition. Frankfurt am Main: Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Zahnerhaltung, 2014. Available at: http://www.dgz-online.de/?download=Wissenschaftliche_Mitteilung_DGZ.pdf Accessed 12 March 2014.

Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program and World Dental Federation Team Up For Better Oral Health

10 February 2014

The Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) is delighted to be a global partner on World Oral Health Day (WOHD) 2014, a FDI World Dental Federation initiative.

WOHD 2014

World Oral Health Day (WOHD) takes place on 20th March 2014 and aims to raise awareness of oral health issues so that governments, health associations, the general public and companies can work together to achieve better oral health, and in turn, lead healthier lives. One of the primary aims of WOHD 2014 is to make it a truly global event and reach as much of the world’s population as possible. Currently 52 countries around the world have announced their participation in WOHD. FDI has enlisted four key partners for WOHD 2014: WOHP, Unilever, Johnson & Johnson and Henry Schein, all working together to promote good oral health.

WOHP will use this opportunity to communicate the importance of chewing sugar-free gum in maintaining good oral health, raise awareness of WOHP and lead best practice in oral care support. Chewing sugar-free gum after eating and drinking on the go helps keep teeth clean and healthy. In fact, “Chew for a Healthy Mouth” is one of the WOHD taglines.

“Wrigley is committed to making a real contribution to the oral health of the world and we are delighted to partner with FDI on World Oral Health Day to support its mission for healthier smiles,” said Matthew Kent, Global Manager, Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program. “Chewing sugar-free gum for 20 minutes after meals and snacks has been proven to help protect our teeth. On World Oral Health Day, we want dental professionals and patients to take one simple, enjoyable step to improve their oral hygiene: chew sugar-free gum after eating and drinking when on the go.”

“We are thrilled to be partnering with the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program on World Oral Health Day 2014,” said Jean-Luc Eiselé, Executive Director, FDI. “We are raising awareness of oral health issues so that governments, health associations and the general public can work together to achieve healthier mouths, and lead happier lives. Working together helps us unite our efforts to prevent the epidemic of caries, gum diseases and tooth loss and help our communities maintain proper dentition for life.”

Participating countries include:

Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Brazil Bulgaria
Cameroon Canada Chile Croatia Ecuador
Finland Ghana Haiti Hong Kong Hungary
India Iran Italy Jamaica Jordan
Kazakhstan Macau Malaysia Mexico Montenegro
Morocco Nepal Netherlands North Cyprus Pakistan
Palestine Poland Romania Russia Saudi Arabia
Serbia Seychelles Slovenia Sudan Tunisia
Turkey Uganda USA UAE Vietnam

About FDI

FDI serves as the principal representative body for more than one million dentists worldwide, developing health policy and continuing education programs, speaking as a unified voice for dentistry in international advocacy, and supporting member associations in oral health promotion activities worldwide.

 

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WOHP

WOHP

WOHP has supported independent clinical research into the benefits of chewing gum for more than 25 years.

Economic benefits of chewing

Economic benefits of chewing

Global health economic data suggests that increasing sugar-free gum consumption could reduce global dental expenditures from treating tooth decay by US$4.1 billion a year. Download Infographic (PDF) and Economic Benefits Study (PDF)

The Science

The Science

Independent research supported by Wrigley funding has continued to have an impact on the oral care arena for nearly 90 years.